Posts Tagged ‘FTC credit freeze’

The number one rule for safely using a debit card: Don’t! But, if you have to use a debit card, here are some suggestions from two of Austin’s leading computer security experts.

Michael Gough and Brian Boettcher are co-creators of LOG-MD, a sophisticated analytical tool used by computer security professionals. I recently had a conversation with them about how to use credit cards and debit cards more safely.

They said: Limit debit card use to only one local grocery store chain, especially if it has gas stations and stays open 24 hours a day. That way you can get cash without using the card in an outside ATM. Of course, the risk of being robbed is also much higher at an ATM. If you always use the same grocery store, then if the number is stolen, you know where it happened.

They said: Do not ever use a debit card at a self-service checkout, an ATM, or a gas pump. It is almost impossible to tell if the card reader has been compromised.

(Brian Krebs, who writes the blog KrebsOnSecurity, talks about card skimmers in this series of articles. Krebs updates these articles on a regular basis and they are well worth reading. In fact, as I have mentioned before, his column is a great place to find out about security issues.)

They said: You may also be able to buy store gift cards with your debit card to use at their gas pumps without having to pay a fee to use them the way you do with MasterCard or Visa cards. And the cards may even be reloadable. The one drawback? If the card is lost or stolen, the money on it is not replaced the way it would be if you used a credit card.

They said: Do not use a debit card at a restaurant. You have no idea if the person is using a hand-held skimmer on your card. Someone may have placed a skimmer on the restaurant’s card terminal.

 (Restaurants are weak in security because the staff holds your cards out of your sight and out of your control. The authors of this blog each had fraudulent charges placed on their cards after two visits to the same restaurant in the same week. We usually take turns paying. We had different servers each night. We think that they had a little ring going.)

They said: Debit cards are less secure than credit cards because debit cards are directly hooked to a bank account or credit union account. If a debit card gets compromised, your account can be drained. It may take some time—even months—to get the money replaced in your account. And the money may not be replaced at all since it is not insured as it is with a credit card.

They said: Most banks and credit unions are helpful about getting a new debit card, but if a credit card gets compromised, usually a new card can be received in 2 or 3 days, maybe even faster if you can pick it up at your financial institution.

Here are their recommendations for safer credit-card use:

They said: Get a second card with a low limit. This card should be mainly used at less safe locations: public kiosk use (think train tickets or parking) and online shopping, as well as automatic payments. If you have to use self-service checkouts, use the second card. Avoiding self-service checkouts is the best strategy.

They said: That second card can be a handy back-up, in case your main credit card is lost or stolen.

They said: Look over your statements on a regular basis for transactions that you did not make.

They said: Patronize companies that use chip and signature (in the US) card terminals, which in most cases was supposed to be in place in the US by October 2015. Europe uses chip and pin. If a company still has not upgraded from magnetic stripe terminals, tell them why you do not want to shop there. (Or only use cash there.) Gas pump card terminals are required by major credit card brands to be updated to use chip and signature (in the US) by October 2017.

They said: Keep a list of automatic payments, and when they renew. Cancel automatic payments as soon as possible when you switch to another card.

One problem with automatic payments is that they may move to a new card even if you did not authorize it.

They said: Some cards (American Express is one example) will allow you to set a daily limit on spending. They usually alert you as soon as possible if spending goes over that limit.

They said: Replace your cards at least every two years.

They said: Put a credit freeze on your credit. The FTC explains the pros and cons of credit freezes here. There may be a small charge for freezing and unfreezing your credit file, but it is cheaper than credit monitoring, which will not tell you about a breach until after it has already happened.

Michael said: Using credit monitoring is like going to a dentist who only monitors your teeth, but does not fix any cavities found.

They said: Get a copy of your credit report from each of the three credit bureaus yearly. You can cycle them so you get one every four months.

They said: As soon as you hear about a mass data breach that could involve your accounts, call your bank or credit union and request a new card. Do not wait for a notification.

They said: Keep records of each card, the card numbers, the customer service phone numbers and addresses. (It is pretty easy these days to make blow-up copies of the fronts and backs of your cards.)

Michael Gough has worked in the IT and Information Security field for over 18 years. He has a wide variety of experience that includes positions as a security analyst for the State of Texas and the financial and health-care sectors, and security consulting with Hewlett Packard. Michael currently works in the health-care sector as a Blue Team Defender, incident responder, and malware fighter.

Michael has created or co-created several tools used in the security industry, such as LOG-MD, which is a logging tool, and the “Malware Management Framework,” which is used to discover and manage malware. In 2012, Michael discovered a type of malware called Winnti that continues to plague gaming and pharmaceutical companies.

 Brian Boettcher, co-creator of LOG-MD and co-host of Brakeing Down Security, has worked in the IT and Information Security fields for a number of years. Brian currently works as a senior security engineer and incident responder. He is a member of several security groups and presents regularly at security functions.Do not ever use a debit card at a self-service checkout, an ATM, or a gas pump. It is almost impossible to tell if the card reader has been compromised.