Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Oracle, maker of Java, does not have a good track record for fixing holes in Java. A new Java security hole that apparently targets Java 7 (however, some researchers think it also apparently targets  some versions of Java 6) was discovered recently. What options do you have for fixing the problem?

  1. The safest thing to do is to uninstall Java from your computer. If that’s too extreme, then uninstall Java plugins. KrebsOnSecurity has an article listing how to disable Java in Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Google Chrome, which you can access here https://krebsonsecurity.com/how-to-unplug-java-from-the-browser/
  2. If you need to use Java for some sites, then the safest thing to do is to use two browsers and disable the Java plugin for the browser you use most often. For example, disable Java in Firefox and use Internet Explorer for the sites that absolutely must use Java. If you decide on this solution, make sure you keep Java up to date.
  3. Another viable option is to use Firefox with the NoScript plugin, available at http://noscript.net/getit. NoScript allows you to choose when to allow JavaScript to run. NoScript can also block Flash Player, which is another problematic plugin.
  4. If you have a PC, make sure you run Secunia’s Personal Software Inspector available here http://secunia.com/products/consumer/psi/ at least weekly to keep up with any updates available for all of your programs.

This vulnerability affects Macs as well as PCs. Only visiting “safe” sites will not help you avoid this issue.

Oracle released an update to fix this issue last night.

Don’t wait! Save your computer, save your information.

FTC Cellphone PROTECT Initiative

Posted: November 2, 2012 by IntentionalPrivacy in Cell phone, Identity theft
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The FTC’s new program to help combat cellphone theft started on November 1, 2012. The major carriers–AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon–have launched databases for stolen smart phones, so when a cellphone user reports that their cellphone has been stolen, that device will not be able to be used again. http://www.fcc.gov/document/announcement-new-initiatives-combat-smartphone-and-data-theft

The FTC advises cellphone users to lock their phones with a passcode to protect any information on their phone, use software to help locate lost devices and either install a remote-wipe application or enable the feature to remotely wipe a stolen device.

If your cellphone has been provided by your employer, look to them for guidance first.

For more information on how to better protect your cellphone, your provider should provide more information. Search their website using keywords such as “lock,” “locate device,” and “remote wipe.”

Here are a couple articles on what to do:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2352755,00.asp

http://forums.att.com/t5/Apple-Community-Discussion/How-to-SECURE-YOUR-new-iPhone-4S-PLEASE-TAKE-THE-TIME-TO-READ-IT/td-p/3210869

I use Prey at https://preyproject.com/ to track my Mac and Windows laptops. Prey will also work for iOS, Linux, Ubuntu, and Android. While I don’t currently use a smart phone, when I had an Android (company supplied), I tried the Remote Wipe feature provided by our IT department and it worked perfectly. I also used the free version of Lookout for Android.

Facebook Like button snafu

Posted: October 24, 2012 by IntentionalPrivacy in Social media
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According to http://thenextweb.com/facebook/2012/10/04/facebook-confirms-it-is-scanning-your-private-messages-for-links-so-it-can-increase-like-counters/, if you send a message to someone and include a link to a website, Facebook will interpret that as a Like for that website, even though you might not like the website at all.