Protect Your Personal Information Cheat Sheet

Posted: January 2, 2015 by IntentionalPrivacy in Security or Privacy Initiatives, Tips
Tags: , , , , , ,

The amount of information collected on each of us is growing astronomically every day. What can you do to help protect your—as well as your family’s—information?

Note: This information is meant to be a starting place.Technology is constantly changing, so you must consider whether the information provided is timely and applicable to your situation. In order to adequately protect yourself and your family, you also might need to consult with your attorney or accountant or obtain other professional advice.

What information do you want to protect? Here are some categories you might want to consider:

Ad/cookie tracking Identity information Reputation
Digital identity Intellectual property Social media
Electronic devices Location Trash
E-mail Mailbox Travel
Family Medical information Voting
Financial information Personal safety Work information

Where are the threats to your information? Here are some common threats:

Data loss or theft

  • Backup media
  • Mail/trash
  • Organization w/ your info goes bankrupt
  • Paper
  • Website
Types of Malware

  • DNS Changer
  • Drive-by downloads
  • Keyloggers
  • Phishing email
  • Rootkits
  • Search engine poisoning
  • Social media malware
  • Torrents
  • Spyware, Trojan horse, virus, worms
  • Zombies/botnets
  • Etc.
Device loss or theft

  • Computer
  • DVD/CD
  • Backup media
  • USB drives
  • Portable electronic devices
  • Laptop, iPad, smart phones, tablets
Natural or man-made disasters

  • Fires
  • Floods
  • Tornadoes
  • Earthquakes
Personal safety

  • Craig’s List
  • Data leakage
  • Identity theft
  • Social media
ID theft Social engineering / Pretexting

Who do you trust with your information? Here are some organizations that you probably trust:

Accountant, lawyer, other professionals Religious & charity organizations
Employers Schools & Libraries
Financial institutions—banks, credit unions, loans & credit cards, brokerages Retailers & e-commerce sites
Government agencies Social sites
Health care—doctor, dentist, hospital, labs Websites
Insurance companies And …?

Why do you trust people or organizations?

  • Do they have a legitimate need for your information?
  • Do they have policies and procedures to tell you what they do with your confidential information?

When do you trust people or organizations?

  • Do you give confidential information on the phone, in email, texting, or in person?
  • Did you initiate the information exchange?
  • If you don’t feel comfortable, don’t do it.

How do you give people or organizations your confidential information? Think about advantages and disadvantages to giving out your information in person, over the phone, in email or in text messages, on a secure website. If you’re uncomfortable giving out information in a particular situation: don’t do it! Find another way to give the information.

General Tips

  • Don’t leave your electronic devices—cell phones, laptops, tablets, iPads, etc.—unattended in public, including hotel rooms.
  • Don’t ask strangers to watch your things while you go to the restroom or load up on more coffee.
  • Don’t leave your purse or briefcase unattended in public: including shopping carts, restaurants, and coffee shops.
  • Don’t use easy-to-guess passwords: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2063203/This-years-easiest-guess-passwords–discovered-hackers-worked-out.html
  • Don’t post private information on social websites. Remember you have no expectation of privacy on social websites.
  • Data leakage:
    • Be careful about the information you throw in your trash.
    • Collect your mail as soon as possible.
    • Use vacation holds or have a friend collect your mail if you will be gone for more than a couple of days.
    • Do not announce on Facebook or other social media that you are going on vacation. Wait until you get back to share those fabulous pictures!
    • Keep your electronic devices and other valuables out of sight in your vehicle.
    • Read software and services licenses.
    • Use a password or a pin to protect your smart phone.

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